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Fall 2012 Undergraduate Courses

470:101, Elementary German (4 credits)
Section 01: Susan Doose; MWTh 11:30-12:50pm (Scott Hall 115) pdf Syllabus
Section 02: Christina Mandt; MWTh 1:10-2:30pm (MW Hardenbergh Hall A6, Th Bishop House 211) pdf Syllabus
Section 03: Damian Grammatikopoulos; MWTh 2:50-4:10pm (Scott Hall 120) pdf Syllabus
Section 04: Anneliese Boghossian; M 4:30-5:50 (Hardenbergh Hall A5), W 4:30-6:10 (Hardenbergh Hall A3) pdf Syllabus

Not open for credit to students who have had two or more years of high school German.

This course is designed for beginners (students without previous knowledge of German), and offers a fast-paced, thorough introduction to the basics of the German language, with an emphasis on conversation. The course covers the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing; study of grammar; vocabulary building; supplementary work in the language laboratory. We will also examine German culture past and present. Assignments will vary, encompassing speech and written practice. Students of 101 are strongly encouraged to enroll in Elementary German Lab 103.

Elementary German (01:470:102:01)
Sascha Hosters
MWTh 11:30-12:50pm, Scott Hall 121
pdf Syllabus

Not open for credit to students who have had two or more years of high school German.
Prerequisite: 470:101

The course will cover the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing; study of grammar and vocabulary building. There will be supplementary work in the language laboratory.

Elementary German Laboratory (01:470:103:01)
Christophe Kone
T 1:10-2:30pm, Language Lab 119
pdf Syllabus

Corequisite: 01:470:101 Elementary German or 01:470:121 German Intensive Review

This lab course is an instructor-guided laboratory practicum based on intensive use of media. Designed for the improvement of aural/oral skills. Practice involves use of text related audiotapes and videotapes, individual and group work, and recordings of student speech for evaluation of pronunciation and fluency.

Elementary German Laboratory (01:470:104:01)
Devin O'Neal
W 2:50-4:10pm, Language Lab 119
pdf Syllabus

Corequisite: 01:470:102 Elementary German or 01:470:121 German Intensive Review

This is an instructor-guided laboratory practicum based on intensive use of media. Designed for the improvement of aural/oral skills. Practice involves use of text related audiotapes and videotapes, individual and group work, and recordings of student speech for evaluation of pronunciation and fluency.

German for Reading Knowledge (01:470:105:01)
Ute Dine
TTh 6:10-7:30pm, T: Hardenbergh Hall A3, Th Scott Hall 219
pdf Syllabus

Does not satisfy prerequisite for 01:470:131 or 132.
Not open for credit to students who have had two or more years of high school German.

Development of reading-skills course for students of German, and others who want to use the language primarily for reading and research purposes. Emphasis is on grammatical forms, sentence and paragraph structures. Regular practice with expository texts of increasing length and difficulty. Texts chosen from the humanities, the natural and social sciences.

German Intensive Review (01:470:121:01)
Anneliese Boghossian
MWTh 9:50-11:10am, MTh Scott Hall 116, W Scott Hall 219
pdf Syllabus

(121 is for students with two or more years of high-school German who do not place into German 131.)
Not open to students who have taken 01:470:101-102.

An intermediate reinforcement course. Practice in speaking, reading, and writing German; extensive grammar review; cultural topics. Prepares students to take German 131.

Intermediate German (01:470:131:01)
Section 01: Dr. Alexander E. Pichugin; MW 2:50-4:10pm (Hardenbergh Hall B3) pdf Syllabus
Section 02: Devin O'Neal; TTh 6:10-7:30pm (Scott Hall 204) pdf Syllabus

Prerequisite: 470:102, 121 or placement test.

Emphasis on conversation and composition, based on everyday situations, aspects of culture, and contemporary German short stories, review of major grammatical points.

Intermediate German (01:470:132:01)
Doris Glowacki
TTh 4:30-5:50pm, Scott Hall 204
pdf Syllabus

Prerequisite: 470:131 or placement test.

Themes and subjects for discussion and essays include the world of work, multicultural society, young and old, stereotypes and the environment. A variety of grammar topics include all aspects of accusative, dative and genitive cases, adjectives and their endings, subjunctive II, relative clauses, reflexive pronouns/clauses and the passive voice. A variety of short stories will be included for discussion and reading comprehension.

Advanced Conversation and Composition (01:470:231)
Section 01: Olga Liamkina; MTh 11:30-12:50pm (Campbell Hall A3) pdf Syllabus
Section 02: Christophe Kone; TTh 4:30-5:50pm (Murray Hall 211) pdf Syllabus

Prerequisite: 470:132 or placement test.
Counts for general upper-level credits toward the major and minor.

Reading and discussion of advanced text material based on contemporary German culture. Intensive practice in word formation, sentence structure, and expository writing.

Advanced Conversation and Composition (01:470:232:01)
Olga Liamkina
MTh 9:50-11:10am, Frelinghuysen Hall B2
pdf Syllabus

Prerequisite: 470:231
Counts for general upper-level credits toward the major and minor.

Reading and discussion of advanced text material based on contemporary German culture. Intensive practice in word formation, sentence structure, and expository writing

Contemporary German Media and Society (01:470:299:01)
Shambhavki Prakash
M 7:40-9:10pm, German House Second Floor Library
pdf Syllabus

Prerequisite: 470:102.
In German. If taken twice, 470:299 may be counted for three literature/civilization/film credits toward the major and minor.

Development of active language skills and cultural awareness through study of the role of various media (including print, Internet, film, and the other arts) in informing contemporary German politics and society. Special attention to cultural differences between Germany and the United States. Texts and presentations chosen to accommodate language level of students enrolled. In cooperation with the Rutgers College Housing German Special Interest Section, it is an ample opportunity to take advantage of their numerous events and activities, which enable students to learn even more about German culture today. Successful completion of at least German 102 or comparable linguistic ability is highly recommended. Class will be held in German. May be repeated. Three credits from 470:299 may be counted toward the major and minor.

Introduction to German Studies (01:470:304:01)
Professor Michael Levine
TTh 4:30-5:50, T: Scott Hall 219, Th: Scott Hall 116

In English.

An interdisciplinary inquiry into seminal literary, artistic, social, political, and intellectual movements in the history of Germanic cultures and thought from the Middle Ages to the present. Taught by Prof. Levine, the course will include guest lectures by professors from Art History, Music, Philosophy, Jewish Studies, Political Science, History, and German Languages and Literatures. In addition to the particular topics covered, Introduction to German Studies is meant to be a way for students to meet German-related faculty at Rutgers and develop a sense of the conversations in which we, and our respective disciplines, are engaged. Topics include: German art, epic, social life in the Middle Ages; Luther and the Protestant Reformation; “tolerance” and the age of Enlightenment; Romantic music, painting and poetry; industrialization and social change in the 19th C; the impact of Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud; Yiddish language and culture; the Weimar Republic; urban cultures and counter-cultures; Nazism and the Holocaust; the two Germanies and (re)unification. Short readings of texts by Luther, Lessing, Kant, Goethe, the Brothers Grimm, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Kafka, and others. Films by Murnau, Lang, and Riefenstahl. Music by Mozart, Schubert, and Wagner. Course also includes museum visits and a night at the opera. No prerequisites. Open to first-year students. Readings and discussions in English.

Translation Seminar I (3 credits)
01:470:315:01
Dr. Charlotte Craig
MW 2:50-4:10pm, German House 2nd floor library
pdf Syllabus

Prerequisite: 470:232 or permission of Undergraduate Director.
In German. Counts for general upper-level credits toward the major and minor. 

This course serves as an introduction into the methodology and techniques of translating German to English, and English to German. The course will have the form of a workshop in which students learn and develop strategies and techniques to translate a variety of texts from different subject areas. We will practice on typical problems that a translator encounters when faced with texts relating to technology, natural and social sciences, anthropology, history, commerce, advertising, and literature. Through practice exercises and assigned tasks, students will learn how to use a variety of dictionaries, glossaries, and handbooks that are useful for translators. We will also look at the history of translation studies and discuss the practical applications and typical tasks that a translator faces today.

Monsters & Heroes (3 credits)
01:470:329:01
Professor Marlene Ciklamini
MW 2:50-4:10pm, German House 102


Prerequisite: 470:232 or permission of Undergraduate Director.
In German.

The course examines the mythic image of the hero and of monsters as reflected in literary and artistic manifestations. Readings are from the Germanic era, the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Focusing on the conceptual stability of the heroic amid the omnipresence of evil, the discussion will encompass discrete forms of combat in the perennial battle against the threat of destruction, the imperilment of civilization, the community or the self.

Big Bang: Literature of Chaos and Order (3 credits)
01:470:364:01, Cross-listed with Comparative Literature (01:195:398:01)
Professor Nicholas Rennie
TTh5, 2:50 pm – 4:10 pm (Scott Hall 105)


In English. May count toward the interdisciplinary German Studies major or minor. (Be sure to consult in advance with the Undergraduate Director).

Considering how the world began has always also meant wondering how it might end. In recent centuries, increasingly, it has also involved thinking about the position of human beings in a physical and moral universe whose structures can no longer be taken for granted. This course examines the ways a selection of writers and philosophers from the Renaissance to the present have represented dramatic upheavals in the physical universe as analogies for crisis and revolution in the realms of history, politics, psychology, science, and the arts.

German Literature After 1946: Einführung in die deutschsprachige Nachkriegsliteratur (3 credits)
01:470:436:01
Professor Fatima Naqvi
Section 01: TTh4, 1:10 pm – 2:30 pm (German House, Seminar Room)
pdf Syllabus

Prerequisite: 232 or permission of Undergraduate Director.

In German. 

Wir werden uns in diesem Semester mit der deutschsprachigen Literatur nach 1945 befassen. Der kulturelle, politische und wirtschaftliche Kontext, in dem die Werke entstanden sind, wie auch ihre stilistischen und inhaltlichen Merkmale werden unsere Schwerpunkte sein. Einige Autoren werden wir gesondert behandeln (z.B. Brecht, Böll, Bernhard). Um aber einen besseren Überblick über diese Zeit zu gewinnen, werden wir aus Werken anderer Schriftsteller Auszüge lesen. Literarische Entwicklungen sollen durch Vergleiche mit Filmen, bildender Kunst und Architektur verdeutlicht werden.erman. Counts for general upper-level credits toward the major and minor. 

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