Dept Banner
Dept Banner

German Studies Courses

Courses that may be applied toward the German Studies Major or Minor option can be drawn from several disciplines, including:

Anthropology
Art History
Literature and Film
Economics
History
Philosophy
Political Science

Other courses may be added to the list as well. Contact the Undergraduate Director, Nicholas Rennie, nicholas.rennie@rutgers.edu for approval.


Anthropology

01:070:238   ANTHROPOLOGY OF EUROPE (3)
European societies and cultures in modern history; changing anthropological perspectives. Gender, ethnicity, and class. Representations and realities of Europe in the making, including issues of nation-building, colonialism, mass culture, and violence.

Art History

01:082:300   HISTORY OF MODERN CRAFTS AND DESIGN (3)
Crafts from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, with particular attention to major developments such as art nouveau, art deco, and functionalism. Developments in England, France, Germany, and the United States.
Prerequisite: 01:082:106 or permission of instructor.

01:082:313   THE RENAISSANCE IN NORTHERN EUROPE (3)
Religious and secular art in Germany, the Netherlands, and France during the sixteenth century; painting, sculpture, and prints; impact of reformation and humanism.
Prerequisites: 01:082:105,106 or permission of instructor.

01:082:347   EARLY NORTHERN EUROPEAN PAINTING (3)
Development of fifteenth-century easel painting in France, the Netherlands, and Germany; relationship of painting to decorative arts; symbolism, realism, invention from Van Eyck to Bosch.
Prerequisites: 01:082:105,106 or permission of instructor. 

01:082:374   ROMANESQUE AND GOTHIC ART (3)
Art and architecture of Western Europe from AD. 1000 to 1400, from Romanesque symbolic style to Gothic realism.
Prerequisites: 01:082:105,106 or permission of instructor.

01:082:375   RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE ARCHITECTURE (3)
Survey of the most important buildings, architects, and stylistic developments from 1400 to 1750 in Italy, France, England, and Germany.
Prerequisites: 01:082:105,106 or permission of instructor.

01:082:384   ROMANESQUE AND GOTHIC ART AND ARCHITECTURE IN GERMANY (3)
Romanesque and Gothic art and architecture in Germany, with particular attention given to major monuments in southern Germany. Field Trips to the monuments are an important aspect of this course.
Taught in connection with German Summer Program in Constance.

01:082:385   RENAISSANCE TO MODERN ART AND ARCHITECTURE IN GERMANY (3)
German Painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the present. Special attention given to southern German development of baroque and rococo styles. Field trips to various architectural monuments and museums in Germany.
Taught in connection with German Summer Program in Constance.

01:082:390   MODERN ART: TWENTIETH CENTURY (3)
European painting and sculpture to World War II; emphasis on American art from 1945 to the present. Field trips to museums.
Prerequisites: 01:082:105,106 or permission of instructor. 

01:082:482   GERMAN EXPRESSIONISM AND EUROPEAN DADA (3)
German Painting from 1900 to 1930. Dada in Europe and its impact on later developments, including contemporary art.
Prerequisites: 01:082:105,106 or permission of instructor. 

01:082:485   SURREALISM (3)
The origins and influences of surrealist art forms and their relationship to Freudianism. Fantastic art, psychotic art, and related tendencies.
Prerequisites: 01:082:389,390 or permission of instructor.

 Literature and Film

01:195:135   INTRODUCTION TO SHORT FICTION (3)
Study of various genres of short fiction, in English translation, by some of the most important writers in world literature. Course themes focus on the city, the nation, migration and exile, colonialism, science fiction, the fantastic, magical realism, horror, mystery, among others.

01:195:304   FICTION AND IDEOLOGY (3)
Fictional narratives as statements about the social order. Texts by major thinkers such as Marx, Lukacs, Goldmann, Benjamin, and Williams.

01:195:312   LITERATURE AND PSYCHOANALYTIC THEORY (3)
Texts by Freud, Lacan, and Jung. Introduction to the various literary questions raised by modern theories in psychology, particularly psychoanalysis.

01:195:320   WORLD CINEMA I (3)
Developments in French, Italian, British, Russian, and other national cinemas from 1896 to World War II; also examines cross-influences between foreign and American cinema.
Credit not given for both this course and 01:354:320 or 01:175:320.

01:195:321   WORLD CINEMA II (3)
Developments in global filmmaking from the 1950s to the present, with an emphasis on specific national and transnational cultures and their industrial and artistic practices.
Credit not given for both this course and 01:354:321 or 01:175:321.

01:195:342   THE ROMANTIC MOVEMENT (3)
Intellectual currents and representative works, including lyric, prose fiction, and drama of the European romantic movement. Major romantic texts of France, Germany, and Russia.

01:195:356   MODERN FICTION (3)
Major works of fiction from 1900 to 1945 in their historical and political context. Works by such authors as Lawrence, Gide, Woolf, Mann, Malraux, Kafka, Proust, Soseki, and Lu Xun.

01:195:385   MODERN POETRY (3)
Comparative survey of poetry in languages other than English from 1850 to the present. Poets include: Baudelaire, Mallarme, Rimbaud, Rilke, Brecht, Neruda, Vallejo, Mandelstam, Akhmatova, Pessoa, Apollinaire, and Artaud.

01:358:263 CIVILIZATION AND ITS DISCONTENT (3)

01:359:311 HISTORY OF LITERARY THEORY II (3)
Selected trends and texts of literary theory from Romanticism to the present. Prerequisite: 01:355:101 or equivalent.

01:470:241,242 INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE (3,3)
Critical appreciation of German literature through the study of selections of prose fiction, drama, and poetry, and the culture of the periods in which they were written.

01:470:299   GERMAN MEDIA & SOCIETY (1.5)
Development of active language skills through study of the role of various media (including print, internet, film, and the other arts) in informing contemporary German politics and society. Special attention to cultural differences between Germany and the United States. Texts and presentations chosen to accommodate level of students enrolled. All levels of language above German 121 welcome. Required of residents in Leupp Hall German special interest housing. Course open to other students and may be repeated.

01:470:301   INTRODCTION TO LITERARY AND CULTURAL ANALYSIS (3)
Introduction to the basic German terminology of literary and cultural analysis, and preparation for courses in German at the 300 level. Study of literary works and films, as well as newspaper articles, film review, and literary analysis. Prerequisite: 01:470:232, or simultaneous enrollment in 01:470:231 or 232. May be repeated for credit.

01:470:302   INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY AND CULTURAL ANALYSIS (3)
Introduction to the basic German terminology of literary and cultural analysis, and preparation for courses in German at the 300 level. Study of literary works and films, as well as newspaper articles, film review, and literary analysis. Prerequisite: 01:470:232, or simultaneous enrollment in 01:470:231 or 232. May be repeated for credit.

01:470:313   BUSINESS GERMAN I (3)
Development of effective communication models with emphasis on the terminology of economics. Treatment of basic principles governing commercial organizations in German-speaking countries.

01:470:314   BUSINESS GERMAN II (3)
Continuation of 01:470:313 with emphasis on the terminology of international commerce and the development of specialized language skills for diverse business situations. Contrastive treatment of cultural factors affecting German-American trade relations. Prerequisite: 01:470:313 or permission of instructor.

01:470:315   TRANSLATION SEMINAR I (3)
Methodology and techniques of translating German-English and English-German. Texts are drawn from a variety of fields, with special attention to stylistic, syntactic, and semantic divergences between the two languages and the latest developments in computer-generated translations.

01:470:316   TRANSLATION SEMINAR II (3)
Methodology and techniques of translating German-English and English-German. Texts are drawn from a variety of fields, with special attention to stylistic, syntactic, and semantic divergences between the two languages and the latest developments in computer-generated translations.

01:470:321   FUNDAMENTALS OF LITERARY ANALYSIS (3)
Introduction to textual categories, literary terminology, and methodological problems through the analysis and interpretation of representative works of literature.

01:470:323   MASTERS OF GERMAN POETRY (3)
Readings from such poets as Walther von der Vogelweide, Gryphius, Klopstock, Goethe, Schiller, the romantics, Heine, George, Hofmannsthal, Rilke, Benn, and Brecht.

01:470:324   MASTERS OF GERMAN DRAMA (3)
Study of the drama through readings from such playwrights as Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, Kleist, Büchner, Wedekind, Brecht, Handke, and Heiner Müller, along with analysis (using video) of current approaches to theater production.

01:470:325   THE SHORT NARRATIVE: 16TH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT (3)
Studies in short genres of German prose such as the anecdote, farce, fable, novella, and short story.

01:470:326   THE GERMAN FAIRY TALE AND FOLK TRADITION (3)
Studies in the German fairy tale, legend, and folk song; principal characteristics and cultural contexts.

01:470:327   WRITING TRAVEL: MOVEMENT, MIGRATION, MOBILITY (3)
Explores the link between narration and mobility; provides overview of the history of travel and the changes in writing travel from the 18th century until today; engages various literary forms and other media (film, art, and music) as well as cartographic tools offered by digital humanities. Prerequisite: 01:470:232, or simultaneous enrollment in 01:470:231 or 232.

01:470:329   HEROES AND MONSTERS (3)
Survey from medieval literature to the present of the relationship between heroes and monsters, the latter considered as the incarnation of all that would destroy civilization.

01:470:331   GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE MIDDLE AGES (3)
The first "Golden Age" of German literature (1175-1225) in modern adaptation. Readings from such epics as the Nibelungenlied, Tristan, and Parzival, as well as the poetry of the minnesingers.

01:470:332   GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE RENAISSANCE, REFORMATION, AND BAROQUE (3)
German literature from about 1400 to 1700, with emphasis on the following writers: Hutten, Luther, Hans Sachs, Fischart, Opitz, Gryphius, and Grimmelshausen.

01:470:333   GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE ENLIGHTENMENT, ROCOCO, AND STORM AND STRESS (3)
Major authors of the 18th century, including Klopstock, Lessing, Herder, the early Goethe, and Schiller.

01:470:335   GOETHE: LIFE AND WORKS (3)
Close reading of Goethe's works against the cultural, historical, and political background of his time. Selected poems, plays, and prose.

01:470:337   SCHILLER: LIFE AND WORKS (3)
Close readings of Schiller's works against the cultural, historical, and political background of his time. Selected poems, plays, and prose.

01:470:341   GERMAN CIVILIZATION I: FIFTH THROUGH FIFTEENTH CENTURIES (3)
Cultural foundations of the German-speaking areas of central Europe from the fall of Rome to the waning of the Middle Ages. Readings from historical, didactic, and poetic documents, supplemented by slides and recorded music.

01:470:342   GERMAN CIVILIZATION II: SIXTEENTH THROUGH EIGHTEENTH CENTURIES (3)
Cultural foundations of the Holy Roman Empire of the German nation from the age of Luther to the Napoleonic era. Readings from historical, didactic, poetic documents, supplemented by slides and recorded music.

01:470:343   GERMAN CULTURE TODAY (3)
Contemporary cultural, social, and political life in German-speaking countries with emphasis on the daily experience. Audiovisuals, guest lectures, field trips, and contact with resource persons.

01:470:345   GERMAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION (3)
Interpretation and analysis of major works of German literature as cultural phenomena, with special reference to the art monuments of the Lake Constance region. Field trips to key sites in Austria, France (Alsace), Germany, and Switzerland.  Offered only as part of the summer program in Germany.

01:470:346   GERMAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION (3)
Interpretation and analysis of major works of German literature as cultural phenomena, with special reference to the art monuments of the Lake Constance region. Field trips to key sites in Austria, France (Alsace), Germany, and Switzerland. Offered only as part of the summer program in Germany.

01:470:347   GERMAN POLITICS & SOCIETY: GERMANY 1871-1945 (3)
Overview of significant political, historical, and social trends which shaped modern Germany in its early years from the Franco-Prussian War to the end of World War II.

01:470:348   GERMAN POLITICS & SOCIETY: GERMANY 1945 TO THE PRESENT (3) Introduction to major political, historical, and social trends which have shaped German society, both east and west, from the end of World War II to the present.

01:470:349   CONTEMPORARY GERMAN CINEMA (3)
New German cinema as a contemporary mode of artistic expression. Viewing and analysis of films by such outstanding directors as Fassbinder, Herzog, Schloendorff, and Wenders. Emphasis on the "literary" aspects of the German cinema. One section taught in German.

01:470:350   NAZI PERIOD IN FILM (3)
Feature and documentary films dealing with the cultural, historical, and political development of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and its global implications. One section taught in German.

01:470:354   KAFKA AND WORLD LITERATURE (3)
An introduction to Kafka's work and its impact on world literature.

01:470:356   PSY FI: LITERATURE AND PSYCHOANALYSIS (3)
Key psychoanalytic concepts explored through readings of literature, film, case studies, and literary theory.

01:470:360   CLASSIC GERMAN CINEMA: FROM HAUNTED SCREEN TO HYPERREALITY (3) Introdution to canonical films of the Weimar, Nazi, and post-war period and reflects on what constitutes the canon when discussing films, including those of recent vintage. Exploring issues of class, gener, and oedipal conflict by means of close analysis, the course seeks to sensitize students to the cultural context of these films and the changing sociopolitical climates in which they arose. Special attention will be paid to the issue of film style. Directors include Lang, Pabst, Murnau, Riefenstahl, Staudte, Schloendorff, von Trotta, Herzog, Fassbinder, Wenders, Haneke, and Dresen. 

01:470:364   LITERATURE OF CHAOS AND ORDER (3)
Representations of dramatic upheavals in the physical universe as analogies for crisis and revolution in history, politics, psychology, science, and the arts. In literature and philosophy from the Renaissance to the present. Credit not given for both this course and 01:195:371.

01:470:365   LITERATURE AND SOCIETY CHANGE (3)
Interaction between German literature and society from the unification (1871) and industrialization of German to the end of World War II.

01:470:367   POSTWAR NOVEL (3)
Major prose writers of Austria, Germany, and Switzerland since the end of World War II.

01:470:368   POSTWAR DRAMA (3)
Major playwrights of Austria, Germany, and Switzerland since the end of World War II.

01:470:371   MARX, NIETZSCHE, FREUD (3)
Exploration of the work of three German writers who revolutionized modern philosophy, theology, psychology, aesthetics, social and political science, gender studies, historiography, literature, and the arts. Credit not given for both this course and 01:195:374 or 01:730:344.

01:470:373   BERTOLT BRECHT (3)
Study of Brecht's epic (Marxist) theater and its impact on contemporary dramatic theory and theatrical practice; an introduction to Brecht's poetry of engagement.

01:470:376   GERMAN CULTURE THROUGH THE ARTS (3)
Introduction to the visual arts, music, and dance created in German-speaking countries in the 19th and 20th centuries. Taught at the Zimmerli Art Museum by a team of curators, art historians, guest musicians, and dance scholars, and with visits to museums and performances in Manhattan. Open to all students; of special interest to those considering enrolling in the German department's Berlin Summer Program. 

01:470:380   GERMAN-JEWISH LITERATURE AND CULTURE (3)
Survey of German-Jewish culture, 18th century to present. Literature in political-historical context, with some attention to music, philosophy, and film. Special permission required for credit toward major. Credit not given for both this course and 01:563:380.

01:470:381   CULTURAL FOUNDATIONS OF GERMANY (3)
Significant aspects of German civilization from the age of Charlemagne to the unification of Germany in 1870. Focus on the German contribution to music, the arts, the sciences, philosophy, and literature.

01:470:382   MODERN GERMANY (3)

01:470:383   GERMAN MYTHOLOGY (3)
Myths and religious practices of the migration period and the age of the Vikings. Sources: the Eddas, Christian and pre-Christian documents and texts, archaeological finds, place names, modern folkloristic beliefs.

01:470:384   GENDER AND POLITICS IN YIDDISH LITERATURE AND CULTURE (3)
Traces the cultural dynamics of Ashkenazic Jews in 16th- to 19th-century Europe through Yiddish religious writings, folktales, fiction, memoirs, and poetry. All readings in translation. Prerequisites: 01:563:202, 260, or permission of instructor. Credit not given for both this course and 01:563:384 or 01:988:391.

01:470:385   IMAGE OF WOMEN (3)
Selected works of German literature that convey the experience of women cast into socially prescribed roles.

01:470:387   TOPICS IN GERMAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION (3)

01:470:388   TOPICS IN GERMAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION (3)

01:470:389   TOPICS IN GERMAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION (3)

01:470:390   TOPICS IN GERMAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION (3)

01:470:391   TOPICS IN GERMAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION (3)

01:470:392   TOPICS IN GERMAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION (3)

01:470:431   GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY: ROMANTICISM (3) Romantic period from Wackenroder to Eichendorff (1790-1850), including Tieck, Novalis, Hoffmann, A.W. and F. Schlegel, Hölderlin, Kleist, and Brentano. Readings of theoretical and poetic texts.

01:470:435   GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY BEFORE 1945 (3)
Major literary movements and figures from the turn of the century to the end of World War II, including naturalism (Hauptmann); impressionism (Schnitzler); symbolism (Rilke); expressionism (Kaiser, Trakl); neo-factualism (Zuckmayer); the outsiders (Wedekind, Hesse, Kafka); and the anti-Nazi writers in exile (Mann, Brecht).

01:470:436   GERMAN LITERATURE AFTER 1945 (3)
Literary trends and currents from the end of World War II to the present: the "literature of the ruins" (Borchert, Böll); documentary theater (Weiss, Hochhuth); Brecht's epic theater and East Germany; major novelists (Böll, Frisch, Grass, Wolf); and playwrights (Dürrenmatt, Handke).

01:470:444   MASTERS OF GERMAN SATIRE (3)
Satirical features and strategies in literary and visual texts from late medieval carnival plays to postmodern cabaret.

01:470:450   READING WOMEN'S LIVES (3)
Twentieth-century women's literature and film; historical retrospective and methodological introduction prepare for treatement of preeminent postwar texts. Prerequisite: A 300-level course in German or permission of instructor.

01:470:491   SENIOR SEMINAR IN GERMAN LITERATURE (3)
Analysis and interpretation of selected works of German literature with emphasis on various literary genres; discussions, oral and written reports.

01:470:495   SENIOR HONORS IN GERMAN (BA)
Independent research on a topic selected by the senior and approved by a departmental honors committee; carried out under the guidance of a member of the department.

01:470:496   SENIOR HONORS IN GERMAN (BA)
Independent research on a topic selected by the senior and approved by a departmental honors committee; carried out under the guidance of a member of the department.

Economics

01:220:343   EUROPEAN ECONOMIC HISTORY (3)
Emergence of the modern economy in Europe from the sixteenth to the twentieth centruy. Price revolution and mercantilism. Industrial revolution in England and the continent and the formation of international markets. The Great Depression and renewed prosperity.
Prerequisites: 01:220:320 (or 203) and 321 (or 204) and 322.

History

01:506:211   WOMEN IN EUROPE AND THE AMERICAS UNTIL 1800 (3)
Survey of women's roles in Western society and culture-covering Europe and the New World up to about 1800.
Credit not given for both this course and 01:988:211.

01:506:212   WOMEN IN EUROPE AND THE AMERICAS SINCE 1800 (3)
Survey of women's roles in Western society and culture-covering the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Credit not given for both this cuorse and 01:988:260.

01:506:375   JEWISH IMMIGRANT EXPERIENCE (3)
Modern Jewish immigrant experience, focusing on European and Middle Eastern communities resettled in America, Israel, and Europe.
Credit nto given for both this course and 01:563:373 and 01:988:373.

01:510:101   DEVELOPMENT OF EUROPE I (3)
Introductory survey of European history from ancient times to the early modern period. Introduction to historical interpretation and historical inquiry.

01:510:102   DEVELOPMENT OF EUROPE II (3)
Introductory survey of European history from the early modern period to the present. Introduction to historical interpretation and historical inquiry.

01:510:245   THE ARTS OF POWER: RITUAL, MYTH, AND PROPAGANDA (3)
Investigates how paintings, movies, poems, and ceremonies have been manipulated to bolster the political authority of rulers, including Louis XIV, Lincoln, Hitler, and Elizabeth II.

01:510:261   HISTORY OF THE HOLOCAUST (3)
Developments of anti-Semitism in modern European history culminating in the "Final Solution"; special emphasis on Jewish responses and resistance.
Credit not given for both this course and 01:536:261.

01:510:325   NINETEENTH-CENTURY EUROPE (3)
Examination of the formative period of modern Europe, including the industrial and democratic revolutions, nationalism, imperialism, and the crises culminating in World War I.

01:510:327   TWENTIETH-CENTURY EUROPE (3)
Major economic and social forces shaping life in twentieth-century Europe, and efforts of major social groups to cope with and shape these forces.

01:510:363   GERMANY FROM 1871 TO PRESENT (3)
Analysis of the collapse of imperial Germany, the failure of democracy in the Weimar Republic, Hitler's Third Reich, the Holocaust, and restructuring of Germany since 1945.

01:510:383   EASTERN EUROPE, 1945-PRESENT (3)
Impact of communism and neoliberalism on Eastern Europe. Collapse of the Soviet Bloc, transition to liberal market capitalism, and its social consequences. 

01:510:385   RABBIS, REBELS, AND RATIONALISTS: THE JEWS OF EASTERN EUROPE (3)
Economic, legal, and political conditions of Jewish life from the sixteenth century to World War II. Forms of Jewish response: autonomism, messianism, Hasidism, emigration, and socialism.
Credit not given for both this course and 01:563:385. 

01:510:390   JEWISH MEMORY (3)
Course explores various forms of Jewish memory shaped in response to major events, including myths, holidays, monuments, pilgrimages, testimonies, museums, literature, and film.
Credit not given for both this course and 01:563:390.

Philosophy

01:730:205   INTRODUCTION TO MODERN PHILOSOPHY (3)
Study of the formative period of modern philosophy. Readings selected from works of Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.

01:730:310   CONTEMPORARY MOVEMENTS IN PHILOSOPHY (3)
Major movements in twentieth century philosophy, such as American pragmatism, development of logic, logical positivism, existentialism, phenomenology. Philosophers such as Peirce, James, Frege, Russel, Carnap, Wittgenstein, Sartre, Heidegger, Husserl.
Prerequisite: One course in philosophy.

Political Science

01:790:204   CAPITALISM, SOCIALISM, AND DEMOCRACY (3)
Genesis and development of democracies and dictatorships in advanced industrial societies and in the third world. Role of capitalism; revolutionary, conservative, and liberal movements; contemporary forms of imperialism and dependency.

01:790:311   EUROPEAN POLITICS (3)
Analysis of national governments in western Europe and of the European Union (EU). Focus on contemporary issues including economic liberalization, welfare state reform, European law, foreign policy, and enlargement to eastern Europe.

01:790:315   POLITICS AND CULTURE (3)
Relationship among various aspects of culture, e.g., the role of symbol, myth, ritual, and religion and its relationship to politics.

Explore SAS

Contact Us

Academic Building

Academic Building
15 Seminary Pl.
4th Floor
New Brunswick, NJ 08901

p  848-932-7781
f   732-932-7125 
elizabeth.dewolfe@rutgers.edu