Spring 2022

Spring 2022

  • 470:101 Elementary German

     

    This course will introduce students to the language and culture of German-speaking countries, using both prepared and authentic materials with theme-related vocabulary and grammatical structures. Students will have the opportunity to practice listening, reading, writing, and speaking in German through in-class activities and homework assignments. The program of the course corresponds to the Level A1 (Beginner) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR), a widely accepted European standard for language proficiency.

    By the end of the semester students will be able to:

    • understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases aimed at the satisfaction of needs of a concrete type
    • introduce themselves and others and can ask and answer questions about personal details such as where he/she lives, people they know and things they have
    • interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help.More specifically, students will be able to:
    • talk about themselves, their families, and their origins
    • talk about weather and clothing
    • order food and drinks in a restaurant or a café, discuss food and cooking, use cooking recipes
    • discuss different living situations, talk about houses, rooms, etc.
    • talk about their time and make appointments
    • orient themselves in a German-speaking urban setting and ask for directions
    • talk about things that happened in the past;
    • talk about professions, job, study, recreation, and daily life
    • talk about some major landmarks and places of interest of the German-speaking countries
    • talk about health and health issues
    • express their intentions, obligations and necessities.

    No prerequisites. This course is taught in German with some explanation of grammar points in English. Not open for credit to students who have had two or more years of secondary school German. Students of 101 are strongly encouraged to enroll in Elementary German Lab 103.

     

  • 470:102 Elementary German

    Not open for credit to students who have had two or more years of high-school German. Such students should enroll in German 121, unless they have placed into a higher-level German course.

     

    This course will continue introducing students to the language and culture of German-speaking countries, using both prepared and authentic materials with theme-related vocabulary and grammatical structures. Students will have the opportunity to practice listening, reading, writing, and speaking in German through in-class activities and homework assignments. The program of the course corresponds to the Level A2 (Elementary) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR), a widely accepted European standard for language proficiency. By the end of the semester students will be able to:

    • understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment).
    • communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters.
    • describe in simple terms aspects of their background, immediate environment and matters in areas of immediate need.More specifically, students will be able to:
    • understand non-fiction texts on some topics, including classified ads
    • talk about migration, backgrounds, and languages, compare cities and countries
    • talk about families and everyday life, about city and country life
    • describe people
    • talk about travel
    • talk about leisure, hobbies and interests, as well as holidays and traditions
    • talk about media
    • talk about inventions, products and goods
    • organize a trip to a theater, etc.
    • talk about professional life
    • leave a message on the phone
    • express emotions and react to them using language

    The course is taught in German with some explanation of grammar points in English. 

  • 470:103 German for Travel

     

    This course will introduce students to the language and culture of German-speaking countries focusing on the language competencies particularly relevant in travel situations.

    By the end of the semester students will be able to speak about themselves in general and as travelers, ask basic questions about travel, discuss their travel interests and express likes and dislikes, speak about German-speaking countries and their inhabitants, orient themselves in means of transportation and accommodations used in Europe, purchase tickets and book hotel rooms on German-language websites.

    The course is taught in German with some explanation of grammar points and cultural references in English. Not open to students who have completed 01:470:102, 01:470:121, or the equivalent.

  • 470:104 German Conversation

     

    This course will introduce students to the language and culture of German-speaking countries focusing on the language competencies particularly relevant for oral communication in everyday situations. By the end of the semester students will be able to:

    • speak about themselves;
    • ask basic questions;
    • share basic information about their families and relatives;
    • speak about their studies;
    • speak about objects relevant to everyday situations;
    • speak about the weather;
    • express likes and dislikes. The course is taught in German with some explanation of grammar points and cultural references in English.

    The course is taught in German with some explanation of grammar points and cultural references in English. Not open to students who have completed 01:470:102, 01:470:121, or the equivalent.

  • 470:106 German for Reading Knowledge

    Professor Alexander Pichugin

    This course, taught in English and German, continues to develop the basic reading competencies in the German language. Texts read in the course are chosen from the humanities, the natural sciences, and the social sciences.

    By the end of the semester students will be able to:

    • apply specific reading strategies to reading a text in German;
    • read German texts with correct pronunciation and intonation;
    • recognize most grammar phenomena and apply this knowledge to understanding;
    • apply some basic passive vocabulary to reading German texts;
    • efficiently use online and paper-based dictionaries.

    This course is delivered in a hybrid format, which is different from either a traditional classroom-based course or a fully online course. Students spend approximately half the time online and half in the classroom. Instead of meeting in-class twice per week for 80 minutes each class, students will meet once per week, and the rest of the week is held virtually in the Canvas learning management system.

    This course also follows a “flipped classroom” approach to learning. This means that students are expected to prepare for each class through readings, learning vocabulary and completing the assignments prior to attending class. This allows class time to be used for more active and engaging activities for a more enriching learning experience for students.

    The course is taught in English.

  • 470:121 German Intensive Review

    (121 is for students with two or more years of high-school German who do not place into German 131.)
    Not open to students who have taken 01:470:101-102.

     

    An intermediate reinforcement course. Practice in speaking, reading, and writing German; extensive grammar review; cultural topics. Prepares students to take German 131. This course meets with 470:102.

  • 470:131 Intermediate German I

    Prerequisite: 01:470:102, 01:470:108, 01:470:121, or placement.

     

    The first semester of Intermediate German further develops students' German language skills with an emphasis on conversation and composition based on everyday situations, aspects of culture, contemporary German short stories, and review of major grammatical points. Students will strengthen their listening, reading, and writing skills, as well as cultural competency by discussing a variety of cultural topics and themes in the German-speaking world, including personal and community life, media, travel, and art. 

    Fulfills SAS core goal AH q.

  • 470:132 Intermediate German II

    Prerequisite: 01:470:131 or placement.

     

    In this course students will further develop their competencies in German language and culture of the German-speaking countries on the intermediate level, using both prepared and authentic materials with theme-related vocabulary and grammatical structures. Students will have the opportunity to practice listening, reading, writing, and speaking in German through various in-class activities and homework assignments. Using a variety of media, such as written texts, video, and audio clips, students will explore the course’s five major themes: Climate and Environment; Social Behaviors; Generations; Migration; Europe.

    The program of the course corresponds to the Level B1.2, which is the first half of Level B1 (Intermediate) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR), a widely accepted European standard for language proficiency. By the end of the course sequence, students will be able to understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc.; deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken; produce simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest; describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes and ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.

    The course is taught in German with some explanation of grammar points in English.

    Fulfills SAS core goal AH q

  • 470:225 Fairy Tales Then and Now

    Professor Martha Helfer

    In English. No prerequisites.

    01:470:225:02 2nd-year section
    01:470:225:03 3rd-year section
    01:470:225:04 4th-year section
    01:195:246:01

    This course analyzes the structure, meaning, and function of fairy tales and their enduring influence on literature and popular culture. While we will concentrate on the German context, and in particular the works of the Brothers Grimm, we also will consider fairy tales drawn from a number of different national traditions and historical periods, including the American present. Various strategies for interpreting fairy tales will be examined, including methodologies derived from structuralism, folklore studies, gender studies, and psychoanalysis. We will explore pedagogical and political uses and abuses of fairy tales. We will investigate the evolution of specific tale types and trace their transformations in various media from oral storytelling through print to film, television, and the stage. Finally, we will consider potential strategies for the reinterpretation and rewriting of fairy tales. 

    All sections meet together.

    This course has no prerequisites. Taught in English.

    Satisfies SAS Core Curriculum Requirements AHp, WCd.

  • 470:232 Advanced German II

    In German.

    In this course students will further develop their competencies in the German language and culture of the German-speaking countries towards the upper intermediate level, using both prepared and authentic materials with theme-related vocabulary and grammatical structures. Students will have the opportunity to practice listening, reading, writing, and speaking in German through various in-class activities and homework assignments.

    Using a variety of media, such as written texts, video, and audio clips, students will explore the course’s eight major themes: Extreme Things; Nature and Technology, Lifestyles; Sites and Events; Volunteering; Architecture; Germans; Streets and Stories.

    The program of the course corresponds to Level B2 (Upper Intermediate) of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR), a widely accepted European standard for language proficiency.

    The course is taught in German with some explanation of grammar points in English. 

  • 470:247 Psy Fi: Literature and Psychoanalysis

    Professor Michael Levine

    cross-listed with Comparative Literature 195:247:01

    In English. No prerequisites.

    Origins and major concepts of psychoanalysis explored through a close analysis of Freud’s writings with a particular focus on their literary dimension. The course seeks not simply to apply Freud to literature but also to see how psychoanalytic thinking itself might be enriched and expanded by our approaching it through works of art, literature and cinema. The focus this semester will be on family secrets, a topic we will approach through analytic case studies, graphic novels, film, and short fiction. Readings and viewings of works by Abraham and Torok, Bechdel, Conrad, Freud, Gitai, Perec, Poe, Spiegelman, Winnicott, Wolf, and others. In English. No prerequisites. Course fulfills the Core requirements AHo & AHp 

  • 470:275 Introduction to German Studies: 1900 - present

    Professor Michael Levine

    In English. No prerequisites.

    An interdisciplinary inquiry into seminal literary, artistic, social, political, and intellectual movements in the history of Germanic cultures and thought from the 20th century to the present. Taught by Prof. Levine, the course includes guest lectures by professors and advanced graduate students from Art History, Music, Philosophy, Jewish Studies, Political Science, History, Cinema Studies, and German Languages and Literatures. In addition to the particular topics covered, the course is meant to be a way for students to meet German-related faculty at Rutgers and develop a sense of the conversations in which we, and our respective disciplines, are engaged. 

    Open to first-year students and, more generally, to those who might not necessarily wish to become a German major or minor but who seek, as part of a well-rounded liberal arts education, basic familiarity with the rich and often vexed history of things German and their impact on Europe and the world. 

    Topics include: turn-of-the-century Vienna; the Weimar Republic; Kafka, Prague and Minor Literature; Yiddish language and culture; urban cultures and counter-cultures; Freud and the Unconscious; Nazism and the Holocaust; the two Germanies and (re)unification; Germany and the European Union; refugee crises past and present. Short readings of texts by Kafka, Freud, Adorno, Deleuze and Guattari, Bernhard, Wolf, and others; films by Petzold, von Trotta, Haneke, and Gerster; music by Weil, Hollaender, Rammstein, and Hagen. No prerequisites. Readings and discussions in English. Course fulfills the Core requirements AHp, WCD.  

  • 470:299 Contemporary German Media and Society

    Prerequisite: 01:470:102 or 01:470:121, or higher. 

    In German. If taken twice, 470:299 may be counted for three credits towards the major or minor. 

    The main goal of this course is to increase the students' cultural awareness through the study of the various media and their role in contemporary German society, while furthering the students' German language skills through consistent speaking, listening, reading, and writing. In this course, students will explore the traditional, modernized, and news media and the role they play in different realms of contemporary German society. Chosen topics of the course are crucial to understanding the modern German-speaking world and include themes such as social structure, politics, culture, and everyday life. Special attention is paid to cultural comparisons between Germany and the United States.

  • 470:302 Introduction to Cultural and Literary Analysis: Stranger Bodies

    Professor Regina Karl

    Stranger Bodies. The Shapes of German Literature and Culture

    Are we built to be human? What language does our body speak? Can bodies be a cage? For decades, authors and filmmakers have dealt with the intricacies and benefits of the human body compared to other species. This course will explore a wide array of body talk in the German-speaking tradition: appearances of ghosts, robots, insects, and drag queens are just a few examples. Looking at these bodies, we will familiarize ourselves with major concepts in the study of literature and film. Readings include a mischievous hand in a short story by Franz Kafka, a poem about Friedrich Schiller´s skull by J. W. von Goethe, an angry old lady in Friedrich Dürrenmatt´s play “Der Besuch der alten Dame” and a haunting doppelgänger from the Nazi past in Christian Petzold´s film “Phoenix.” This class is designed for students with a solid grasp of basic German vocabulary and grammar who wish to expand their knowledge of the language and culture through reading, discussion, and writing.

    Taught in German. Fulfills SAS core requirements AHp, WCr, WCd.

    300-level German-language courses open to students who have either successfully completed German 232 or will be simultaneously enrolled in either German 231 or 232. May be repeated for credit.

  • 470:329 Heroes and Monsters

    Professor Alexander Pichugin

    In German. 

    The course examines images of the hero and of the monster as reflected in literary and artistic representations. The course material is taken from German-language literature, art, music, and cinema of different time periods. The course discussion encompasses discrete manifestations of combat between good and evil at different levels and focuses on the conceptual stability of the heroic amid the omnipresence of evil.

    300-level German-language courses open to students who have either successfully completed German 232 or will be simultaneously enrolled in either German 231 or 232. 

  • 470:349 Contemporary German and European Cinema

    Professor Regina Karl

    Cross-listed with Cinema Studies 01:175:349:01 and European Studies 01:360:349:01

    Taught in English. No prerequisites.

    In light of the 2008 economic crisis, the refugee and humanitarian crisis as well as the Corona pandemic, the EU has seen a troubling resurgence of inequality, racism, and political hatred. Pairing the formal and stylistic specificities of contemporary German & European filmmaking with essays, poems, and short fiction by young, post-migrant, and queer voices, we will investigate the formation of history, memory, and cultural identity in Europe today, shed light on the role of film festivals, consider the impact of streaming platforms, and reframe the concept of national cinema. The course includes several workshops to train and hone your writing skills, including workshops with a renowned journalist and critic who will be giving you professional instructions on how to write a film review. Additionally, you will get to filmmakers and  producers via guest visits and virtual interviews.

    Fully online, mixed asynchronous and synchronous.

    Course taught in English.

    Satisfies SAS Core requirements AHp and WCD.